Weekly Photo Challenge: Threes – Peruvian cloudforest hides wonders

Thousands of people visit the ruins of Machu Picchu in Peru every year, but few take the time to explore the surrounding cloud forest, an amazing ecosystem in the Andes Mountains. Instead of rushing up and down the mountain in one day, we went up by train and stayed for two nights at the Inkaterra Machu Picchu Pueblo Hotel on the outskirts of the town of Aguas Calientes, which is the base from which most people visit the ruins. The Inkaterra hotel, an award-winning eco-sensitive property, is spread through 12 lush acres of the cloud forest along the Urubamba River and makes the most of its jungle setting. You stay in cozy white-painted adobe casitas with Andean blankets on the beds and toiletries made from plants on the hotel property.

Casitas at the Inkaterra hotel - photo by E. Jurus
Casitas at the Inkaterra hotel – photo by E. Jurus

You can book a variety of activities, some complimentary when as part of your stay, others at an additional cost. We paid for a privately-guided morning tour of Machu Picchu that included transportation and admission to the site, but the complimentary activities available included tea-making at the hotel’s small tea plantation, bird walks, ancient ceremonies, and, since we were there in November — orchid season — an orchid walk. Our guide was an expert at finding the tiniest orchids hiding amidst the lush vegetation, and even helped us take close-up photos of these amazing plants. It was a not-to-be-missed experience!

Booking a package is easy: just contact the hotel through its website: http://www.inkaterra.com/inkaterra/inkaterra-machu-picchu-pueblo-hotel/. The staff are very friendly and welcoming. A full hot and cold buffet breakfast and dinner at one of the two restaurants are usually included, and the food is terrific. One note of warning: the pizco sours are deadly here, so drink one slowly!

A special feature of the hotel is a sanctuary for Andean Spectacled Bears. The project, in conjunction with the Peruvian government, rescues the bears (the only bear native to S. America) from the brutal pet trade and rehabilitates them for reintroduction into the wild. There were three bears in residence when we were there, and they were adorable as they clambered around the various props designed to reteach them forest survival skills.

Spectacled Bears love avocados! - photo by E. Jurus
Spectacled Bears love avocados! – photo by E. Jurus

There’s also a terrific spa where I had one of the best massages of my life, using oils made from the unique jungle plants.

The town of Aguas Calientes is just across a small bridge from the hotel, so it’s easy to walk into town to explore the great craft market and perhaps have some Peruvian food in one of the restaurants.

All in all, a wonderful place to spend some time, so I highly recommend including a couple of extra days to fit this into your schedule when you visit Peru. If you’d like more information, drop me a line!

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Cee’s Which Way Challenge: A hair-raising ride up Machu Picchu mountain

The switchback road up Machu Picchu mountain - photo by E. Jurus
The switchback road up Machu Picchu mountain – photo by E. Jurus

If you’re not up to spending 4 days hiking the Inca Trail up to Machu Picchu citadel in Peru, one of your other options is to take one of the many buses that careen up and down the mountain all day long. But don’t think you’re getting off too easy: it’s quite a ride up the tight switchbacks of the road, with a steep drop-off on the outside edge.

The view is amazing but disconcerting: it feels like you’re suspended in mid-air at some points, at others like you’re floating straight up the side of the mountain.

Approaching one of the switchbacks on the road to Machu Picchu - photo by E. Jurus
Approaching one of the switchbacks on the road to Machu Picchu – photo by E. Jurus
Looking out from the Machu Picchu switchback road - photo by E. Jurus
Looking out from the Machu Picchu switchback road – photo by E. Jurus

The drive becomes really interesting when two buses have to pass each other!  It’s all worth it though — seeing Machu Picchu in real life is an incredible experience. But that’s a tale for another Challenge entry 🙂

Passing another bus on the Machu Picchu mountain road - photo by E. Jurus
Passing another bus on the Machu Picchu mountain road – photo by E. Jurus

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Winter escapism – Plan a safari!

Herd of giraffes, Savute Reserve, Botswana - photo by E. Jurus
Herd of giraffes, Savute Reserve, Botswana – photo by E. Jurus

Much of Canada and the U.S. are having a punishing winter this year. My favourite form of escapism is to spend time researching and planning a new adventure. For a few hours I can immerse myself in someplace warm and exotic.

Going to Africa is a classic adventure, immortalized by Hollywood in many films, from fantastic to kitschy to wild and woolly. I’ve had the good fortune to travel to a variety of different places, and Africa is still tops in my books. There’s a feeling that you get when you’re gazing across the endless savannahs, or canoeing through thick reeds, when you look into the face of an elephant coated in red dust, when you sit around a campfire at night listening to hippos grunting at each other in the distance, that makes you feel connected to the planet and the eternal cycle of life in a way I’ve not experienced anywhere else. (I invite you to share with me other places where you’ve felt the same.)

Dirt-coated elephant, Samburu Reserve, Kenya - photo by E. Jurus
Dirt-coated elephant, Samburu Reserve, Kenya – photo by E. Jurus

Doing a safari usually ranks pretty high on people’s bucket lists, but I’ve chatted with a lot of people who find it overwhelming just getting started.

I can sympathize – it took me several years to plan and set up our first safari. To help you start creating yours, I’ve posted our first planning guide: Theme Trip – The Safari. You’re going to have to do your own research to create a shortlist of places you’d like to go, but my guide will provide you with:

–          some essential information to start narrowing things down

–          an understanding of what a typical safari day is like

–          recommended things to pack

–          what you need to know about health matters

–          photographic equipment essentials

Research is key. Decide what animals you’d like to see (gorillas, for example, only live in hot humid jungles), what other activities you might
want to do (ballooning, mountain climbing, visiting a tribal village, wine-tasting, white-water rafting…), and what time of year you can travel in. Then decide on your budget – that will be your biggest determining factor.

Samburu villagers performing tribal dance, Kenya - photo by E. Jurus
Samburu villagers performing tribal dance, Kenya – photo by E. Jurus

There’s so much to see and do, I couldn’t put it all into the guide, but there are some good travel guides to different parts of Africa available, and lots of info on the internet. I’d also recommend picking up travel magazines about Africa and researching any of the safari companies that interest you to see if they have the style you’re looking for, as well as the credentials.

Next you’ll want to read the LTM guide, make your final destination choices, and start getting ready.

There’s much more information that I didn’t include at the risk of turning the guide into a novel, but I welcome any questions you may have – just post a comment and I’ll do my best to supply what you need to know. Happy planning!

Bataleur eagle, Okavango Delta, Botswana - photo by E. Jurus
Bataleur eagle, Okavango Delta, Botswana – photo by E. Jurus

Beautiful Bees – one of our most precious resources

Bee in our homestay's kitchen garden, Amantani Island, Lake Titicaca Peru - photo by E. Jurus
Bee in our homestay’s kitchen garden, Amantani Island, Lake Titicaca Peru – photo by E. Jurus

Bees are essential to our survival, and they’re in trouble in countries around the world. Scientists aren’t sure what’s causing their decline, but are researching frantically to find out. Without bees to pollinate them, our global plants are in jeopardy, so you can help by joining in any petition or initiative you see to ban pesticides that are harmful to bees.

To help you appreciate the beauty of bees, enjoy some stupendous close-up photos just posted by National Geographic — you’ll never look at bees in the same way again! Their colours, complexity, incredible variety…take a look.