Autumn Mystery Lovers’ Tea

Poirot straightened up and asked sharply: “What has happened?”

“Linnet Doyle’s dead—shot through the head last night.”

Poirot was silent for a minute, two memories vividly before him—a girl in a garden in Assuan saying in a hard breathless voice, “I’d like to put my dear little pistol against her head and press the trigger,”…

I’ve always had a sneaking desire to be part of a Hercule Poirot mystery. How much fun it would be to attend an elegant soiree or, even better, a weekend house party at a great estate while Poirot questions everyone with consummate charm!

The first time my hubby and I went to England, it was in early November and we fully embraced our mystery-geek sides, dressing in trench coats and flannel trousers, visiting 221B Baker Street and the Sherlock Holmes Pub, and warding off the cool weather with hot tea in cozy little restaurants, so I will admit to being somewhat biased, but Fall seems like the best time to dive into a mystery novel. Something about the chill in the air mimics the shivers down your spine as an astute detective tries to outwit and catch the clever murderer.

England is the honorary home base of mystery stories and novels, but the origin of the genre in a major novel is attributed to Edgar Allan Poe’s The Murders in the Rue Morgue in 1841. My favourite authors straddle both sides of the Pond, and farther abroad as well.

I love period flavour and settings that are their own characters in the story. The Victorian setting of the Sherlock Holmes stories enhances the interplay of Holmes and Watson, and created such a powerful aura that to this day some people are convinced that Holmes was a real person. 1930s flavour permeates the stories from my other two favourite British authors, Agatha Christie and Dorothy Sayers, and it was the movie version of Death on the Nile in 1978 with spectacular scenes of Egypt as a backdrop that inspired me to pursue my long-held dream and actually put together a trip there for our 10th wedding anniversary.

Edgar Allan Poe’s stories have a decidedly macabre bent that makes them great to read around Halloween, but I also love the moody film-noir vibe of Dashiell Hammett. I really got into The No. 1 Ladies’ Detective Agency stories by Alexander McCall Smith after we’d been to Botswana, and through television we’ve discovered the charming Miss Fisher and intricate Dr. Blake mysteries from Australia, and even the Brokenwood Mysteries crime series from New Zealand. Here in Canada, although we haven’t read the books, we’re proud to be the home of the brilliantly-produced Murdoch Mysteries television series set in Toronto at the turn of the 20th century, incorporating cultural and political details of the era as well as a variety of historical figures of the time – Nicola Tesla, Mark Twain and Arthur Conan Doyle are just a few.

This month, celebrate Autumn by snuggling up with a cup of good tea (and some delicious treats, of course) while you immerse yourself in a great mystery for a few hours.

One of my favourite teas for fall pleasure is called Russian Caravan: it has some smokiness to it, making it a perfect match for more intense fall flavours that won’t get lost against the strength of the tea.

Here are some suggestions for putting together an easy, atmospheric tea to have with your favourite mystery and a pot of Russian Caravan tea (these can all be made gluten-free if needed):

  • A smoked ham and aged cheddar sandwich with mango chutney
  • Roast beef sandwich with horseradish and black pepper crème fraiche
  • Curried chicken, dried cranberry and pecan sandwich
  • Scones with lush pumpkin butter or plum jam
  • A slice of spiced cake – try the recipe I’ve included below

Back in the 1990s there was a wonderful cooking magazine available called Chocolatier. While it was devoted lovingly to all things chocolate, it also featured a variety of other desserts, along with thorough recipes and interesting anecdotes. I loved leafing through each issue, salivating over the gorgeous photos and deciding which recipes I wanted to try out.

Chocolatier Magazine, June 1998, White House Desserts 1800 – 1998

Recipe from Dolley Madison’s personal collection, wife of James Madison inaugurated in 1809. “in her papers, Dolley left recipes for ginger pound cake and a strawberry roll. Her love of sweets was legendary and she was quoted as saying, ‘I derive my pleasure from my indulgences.’ ”

Her original recipe for the ginger pound cake was written simply as: “2 lbs. flour, 1 pint molasses, 1 lb. sugar, ½ pint sour cream, 1 lb. butter, 1 cup ginger, 10 eggs, 1 teaspoon baking soda (dissolved in warm water). Mix and bake as a pound cake.”  Chocolatier magazine provided a modernized version that produced a deep amber bundt cake which I wanted to try out as soon as I saw the photo. Finally, with my discovery of a great gluten-free all-purpose flour by Bob’s Red Mill, I gave it a shot. It turned out beautifully (photo below), if perhaps not as smooth an outer surface as the original and a little smaller, since gluten-free flour doesn’t rise as much as regular flour. The texture and crumb turned out beautifully. It made a surprisingly light fall cake, not too heavily spiced and perfect with smoky Russian Caravan tea on a cool day with the leaves falling outside.

Sadly the magazine is no longer being published, so here’s the recipe for you to enjoy as well. I substituted my gluten-free flour one-for-one for the cake flour in the recipe, plus an extra two tablespoons to compensate for the difference in flour textures (cake flour is denser). Make sure all your ingredients are at room temperature before assembling for successful baking. Also, make sure you grease every nook and cranny of your bundt pan, including the centre tube, so it will release the cake completely when it’s done. I find that taking a thin flexible knife (like a small butter spreader) and running it carefully around all outer edges of the cake, including the part around the centre tube, also helps the cake come out better.

(Note: I didn’t use the confectioners’ sugar garnish, so you won’t see that in my photo.)

Fresh Ginger Pound Cake with Cardamom Syrup

Yield: one 10-inch bundt cake serving about 12 to 14

Difficulty: Easy

Preparation: 30 minutes plus baking and cooling times

Ginger pound cake:

3 cups cake flour

2 teaspoons ground ginger

1/2 teaspoon baking powder

1/2 teaspoon baking soda

1/2 teaspoon salt

1 cup (2 sticks) unsalted butter, softened

1 & 1/2 cups granulated sugar

3 large eggs

1 & 1/2 cups tablespoons peeled and grated fresh gingerroot

1 teaspoon fresh lemon juice

1 cup milk

Cardamom syrup:

1/4 cup water

1/2 cup granulated sugar

3 cardamom pods

One 1/2-inch thick slice peeled fresh gingerroot

6 black peppercorns

Garnish:

Confectioners’ sugar for dusting

Make the cake batter:

1. Position a rack in the center of the oven and preheat to 350oF. Butter and flour the inside of a 10-cup Bundt pan, or coat it with non-stick cooking spray. Set aside.

2. Sift together the flour, ground ginger, baking powder, baking soda and salt. In the 4 & 1/2 quart bowl of a heavy-duty electric mixer using the paddle attachment, beat the butter for 2 minutes at medium speed, or until creamy. Add the sugar and continue beating for 2 minutes, or until the mixture is light in texture and color. Beat in the eggs, one at a time, beating for 30 to 40 seconds after each egg is added. Scrape down the side of the bowl frequently with a rubber spatula to keep the batter even-textured. Blend in the grated gingerroot and lemon juice.

3. On low speed, alternately add the sifted mixture in three additions with the milk in two additions, beginning and ending with the sifted mixture.

4. Pour and scrape the batter into the prepared pan. Smooth the top with a rubber spatula. Bake the cake for 50 to 55 minutes, or until risen and a wooden toothpick inserted into the cake withdraws cleanly. Cool the cake in the pan over a wire rack for 10 minutes, then invert it onto another rack.

Make the syrup:

5. Combine the water, sugar, cardamom, ginger and peppercorns in a small non-reactive saucepan. Set over medium heat, and warm the mixture, stirring frequently until the sugar melts, 3 to 4 minutes. Remove the pan from the heat, cover, and let the mixture stand for 10 minutes, allowing the flavors to infuse into the syrup.

6. Strain the syrup through a medium sieve into a small bowl. Using a pastry brush, dab the syrup over the surface of the warm cake, allowing it to sink into the cake before reapplying it in the same area. Let the cake cool completely.

Garnish the cake:

7. Sprinkle the top of the cake with confectioners’ sugar before serving.

I really miss this magazine, but a collection of some of the recipes is available through Amazon: Chocolate passion: recipes and inspiration from the kitchens of Chocolatier magazine. If you decide to try the recipe, I’d love to know how it turned out, and please feel free to share the titles of some of your favourite mystery stories! Happy reading 🙂

Post-shopping tea breaks

misc jan-may13 039

Going out shopping, even just for groceries, can be such an exercise in frustration. A few of my pet peeves include: people who leave their shopping cart in the middle of the aisle while they wander off somewhere else to grab an item, blocking everyone else’s way; people who block the entire aisle at food-sampling booths; people in the parking lot who can see you backing out from 10 feet away and still think it’s a good idea to walk behind you…

On days like that, I restore my depleted energy and sorely-tested good nature with a mug of tea and something both yummy and easy to make. The tea I usually have is a heady mug of Assam, full-bodied and aromatic. The carb-supplier is a gluten-free English muffin by a company called Kinnikinnik, toasted to a golden brown and topped with a lovely dollop of crème fraiche (I use Liberty brand) and a really good jam (in this case, Greaves’ wonderful apricot jam). We’re very lucky in Niagara to have ready access to Greaves jams, produced locally and some of the best jam outside of homemade that I’ve ever had — not too much pectin, so their jams have a nice texture for spreading, and a perfect amount of sweetness without being cloying. They’re nicely balanced by the mild tartness of the crème fraiche, and toasting the English muffin provides a slightly crunchy base along with great flavour.

If you’re on a gluten-free diet, this is a great combo to have with tea, and even if you can eat wheat you may want to check out these English muffins, which are perfect for the purpose. The muffins can be found in the freezer compartments of health-food sections in grocery stores, and in health-food stores as well. I recommend putting them into the microwave first for about 15-30 seconds, depending on whether you’ve thawed them out or just pulled a frozen one from the bag; microwaving softens them up and produces a nice crumb texture when you split them with a serrated knife. You can put the whole thing together in about 10 minutes, leaving you lots of time to put your feet up and relax!